Tour the East Asian Library

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Did you know the University of Toronto has its own library dedicated to the Studies of East Asia?

The Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library is located on the eighth floor of Robarts Library. It  contains rich materials covering various topics in relation to China, Japan, Korea and Tibet, as well as in Asian Canadian studies. You can find publications written in Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Tibetan on literature, history, religion, international relations, arts, pop cultures, social sciences and more. The Mu Rare Books Collection and  Tibetan Collections within the library also offer precious historical primary sources unique to this library. With over 600,000 volumes of print publications and a variety of scholarly electronic resources, it is one of the most extensive East Asian Studies collections in North America.

The library is open for all to use, no TCard check is required. And if you are still hesitant about visiting, you can learn more about the library by watching the video below.

This video is composed of an interview with Hana Kim, the director of the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, along with a visual tour of the library to give you a sense of what it can offer you. Much more remains to be seen and it is up to you to discover it.

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The 17th “Chinese Bridge” Chinese Proficiency Competition: U of T Preliminary Finalists

Students from EAS’s Chinese language courses participated in the 17th “Chinese Bridge” Chinese Proficiency Competition Preliminary Competition – Toronto Final on Saturday, March 24, at the Confucius Institute at Brock University. At the competition, each contestant had to give a speech on  “天下一家 One World, One Family” and present a talent performance related to Chinese culture. Our EAS200Y student Benjamin McDonald won second prize; our EAS402H student Moon Yong Zong won third prize. Benjamin will represent the University of Toronto as an observer at the 2018 “Chinese Bridge” Chinese Proficiency Competition for Foreign Students in China in the summer. Congratulations to Benjamin McDonald and Moon Yong Zong!

 

You can watch their talent performances here:

Benjamin McDonald

Moon Yong Zong

 

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CIE Information Session: Akita International University

The Centre for International Experience is inviting a delegation from Akita International University to host an information session for students on Monday, February 12 at 11 amIt is a great opportunity for you to pose questions you have regarding the exchange program, get to know the University, and network with other students who are going.

Students who are interested can register for the event at the Student Life Calendar

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U of T hosting the American Association of Teachers of Korean Annual Conference in June

The Department is pleased to be hosting the American Association of Teachers of Korean (AATK) conference from June 21-23, 2018. The conference is sponsored by the Korea Foundation, and co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto, the Korea Education Centre of the Korean Consulate in Toronto, and the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in Toronto. Professor Alister Cumming is the keynote speaker, with Professors Eunice Jang and EAS’s own Andre Schmid giving plenary talks. There will be a special presentation by Professor Junghee Lee, president of IAKLE.

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Professor Yoneyama awarded Best Book in Humanities and Cultural Studies by the Association of Asian American Studies for Cold War Ruins

Congratulations to Professor Lisa Yoneyama for receiving the 2018 best book award in Humanities and Cultural Studies from the Association of Asian American Studies for her book, Cold War Ruins: Transpacific Critique of American Justice and Japanese War Crimes (Duke University Press). The AAAS selection team commended Prof. Yoneyama’s latest book:
yoneyama-book-cover “Cold War Ruins presents a stunningly masterful engagement with the most pressing concerns in the fields of Asian American studies and Asian studies/area studies today. In recent years, there has been much discussion in both fields about the necessity for dialogue and engagement across these disciplinary divides. Cold War Ruins exemplifies the very best this cross-fertilization can offer.”
Prof. Yoneyama’s award will be recognized at the upcoming AAAS annual conference in San Francisco, California in March, 2018.

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Special Talk: Security Cooperation in East Asia, Japan, South Korea, and the United States

The Munk School of Global Affairs Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Department of Political Science, and the Consulate General of Japan in Toronto presents Security Cooperation in East Asia, Japan, South Korea, and the United States. 
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EASGSU Presents Area Studies, Capital, and the Anthropological Difference

The East Asian Studies Graduate Student Union is inviting Dr. Gavin Walker (McGill University) for a talk entitled “Area Studies, Capital, and the Anthropological Difference” on Thursday January 25th from 4:30 – 6:30 pm, to be held in the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th Floor).

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“Today, in a world characterized by the dispersion of the concentration of the productive forces, an increasingly multinational composition of global finance capital and its specialized class of handlers, it is relatively common to hear that the problems of “area studies” and its critique are no longer relevant. This argument tends to be made as follows: area studies depended on a world characterized by the classic mid-20th century structures of alignment: the US-aligned world, the USSR-aligned world, the so-called “non-aligned” world, and so on. But, so this logic goes, today the world that is implied by this organizational schema itself no longer exists, and therefore the problem of area studies has ceased to be an essential target: it is a “remnant” which is “withering away.” But I want to argue here that it is in fact exactly the opposite, that we will miss something crucial in the question of area studies if we imagine that it is no longer a problem for thought and politics simply because of the process of “globalization.” In fact, paradoxically, it is the current moment of the integration of the world in which the problem of area studies becomes most decisive. What possibilities remain today for area studies after its critique?”

We hope that you can join us for this event.

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Jackman Humanities Institute Presents Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow

On Wednesday January 17 at 4 PM, the Jackman Humanities Institute is hosting a talk by Dr. Audra Simpson from the Anthropology Department of Columbia University. In Savage States: Settler Governance in  an Age of Sorrow, Dr. Simpson considers the world of settler colonialism, which demands a newness and a world in which Native people and their claims to territory are whittled to the status of claimant or subject in time with the fantasy of their disappearance and containment away from a modern and critical present.

The event is hosted at Room 100 in the Jackman Humanities Institute building (170 St. George Street). It is free and open to all, we hope to see you there!

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EAS Speaker Series: Mobility and Borders between Russia and Asia: Claiming Korean Migrants in the Late Nineteenth Century by Dr. Alyssa Park

The East Asian Speakers Series presents a talk by Dr. Alyssa Park, Mobility and Borders between Russia and Asia: Claiming Korean Migrants in the Late Nineteenth Century on Friday, January 19, 1 – 3 pm at the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor). 

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The late nineteenth century was the era of mobility and bordermaking around the globe.  States defined borders and claimed space within them to an unprecedented degree, and people traveled across space, transgressing those borders.  This talk explores these topics in a single analytical lens through the case of Korean migrants living in the Maritime, the Russian side of a newly delineated border area (Korea, Russia, China).  Why they migrated, how officials viewed them, and what kinds of conflicts and questions arose from their respective claims on Koreans are subjects that will be discussed, as are the possibilities for the writing of transnational history for Russia and East Asia.

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Munk School Presents How ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaping Japan-South Korea Relations

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How Have the ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaped Japan-South Korea Relations?

The Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Asian Institute, and the Centre for the Study of Korea from the Munk School of Global Affairs present a talk from Dr. Seung Hyok Lee, Professor at the Department of Political Science at University of Toronto, and Associate Professor of Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs.

The event will be held at 1 Devonshire Place, North House Room 208N on Friday, January 19, 2018 2:00 – 4:00 PM.

South Koreans and Japanese citizens have become influential in shaping their respective countries’ bilateral relations. This societal-level sway on government interactions is especially evident when a publicized shared issue linked to national security prompts the mainstream citizenry’s emotional involvement. This presentation will focus on Japan-South Korea bilateral relations during the last decade to illustrate this.

In the midst of the fast-changing regional security environment of the past ten years, the two societies have begun to re-evaluate and re-examine their respective Cold War period national security identities.

Interestingly, both countries’ identity-shifts were first fuelled by the changing domestic public attitude toward North Korea. The normative transformations sparked by the ‘North Korea factors’ has also led to a ‘mutual security anxiety’ between Japanese and South Koreans, as they learn to embrace a sense of uncertainty about the other side’s possible future trajectory. This societal-level mutual distrust continues to provide a powerful ideational limit to government-level bilateral interactions.

More information: Click Here

Register for the Event Here: http://uoft.me/japansouthkorea

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EAS308 Students Reveal the Wonder of Maps!

On Thursday December 7, an exhibition on maps of East Asia was held at the East Asian Library. Students from EAS308 brought in their beautifully designed posters to present various research topics they have researched.

 

The topics that students have chosen ranged from looking at comparisons between maps of the East versus the West, specific foci on maps of a certain period in Japan, China, or Korea and how they developed, landmarks on historical maps and where they are today, ways sea routes and floras are depicted in maps, and more.

 

Students shared their insights into the maps and provided interesting observations about them. Here are some of their discoveries:

25289245_10213235996005802_2486836241075824633_n“Both the Japanese and American maps during the wartime are drawn as cartoons, since they were meant for kids. The Japanese map had text on it, whereas the American one does not. This is because the audience for the American one is younger than the Japanese one. It is also interesting that except for the soldier controlling navy ships from Britain, the rest of the countries in Europe are portrayed as dogs with flags wrapped around them.”
— Wartime Cartography – Children’s Edition

img_7018“This map depicts a region in China called Ning Bo. On the side we’ve made a legend which shows various symbols used by the cartographer to represent religious institutions. While the prominent religion seems to be Buddhist and Daoist, Catholic churches and Mosques were also found in the region.”
— The Map and Land of Ning Bo

img_6998“The Cheonhado portrays land as round because of the influence of Chinese Buddhist and Daoist views. With China and Korea in the middle, they saw themselves as the centre of the world. Surrounding them are the ‘mystical lands’ which include the West and all the places they have not travelled to yet. Among them are also some fictional lands.”
— Cheonhado & Kangnido: Choson’s
Relationship with the World

25158213_10213235983245483_7541406414316950167_n“From the maps you can see the expansion of Edo through the changes in the waterways across time. Although major waterways remained constant, the smaller ones were filled up in order to make more land.”
— Tokugawa Edo: Dawn to Dusk Social Control and Social Change Seen in Maps

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East Asia on Maps Ancient and Modern: A Poster Session in the East Asian Library

East Asia on Maps Ancient and Modern
A Poster Session in the East Asian Library

Come by the Chen Yu Tung East Asian Library on Tuesday, December 5, from 12 to 1:30 pm to see a showcase of East Asian maps by the EAS308 students and learn about cartography.

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EAS Speaker Series: Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo by Naomi Paik

The East Asian Speakers Series presents a talk by Dr. Naomi Paik, Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo on Friday, December 1, 3 pm to 5 pm at Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2125.

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Naomi Paik will address themes raised in her new book, Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps Since World War II, which grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Specifically, this talk will focus on both the bodily practices of and discourses surrounding prisoner practices of self-harm and the U.S. state’s efforts to preserve life—in particular, its force-feeding of hunger strikers at the current Guantánamo camp. By interpreting the testimonies of hunger strikers, Paik examines the prisoner body as a site of power and struggle waged between the U.S. state and the prisoners, who attempt to seize their own form of habeas corpus, taking their bodies back from the camp regime, by inflicting self-harm.


Alongside this talk, the Department of Geography and Planning, in collaboration with the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, the Department of East Asian Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, have also asked Naomi to participate in a more informal workshop with an interdisciplinary group of grad students and faculty. As part of this event, Naomi will be circulating a work-in-progress paper that she is currently revising for publication.

Its abstract will most likely look something like this:
“This essay examines the dangerous convergence of of neoliberal capitalism and state violence in military outsourcing. It does so by analyzing Adhikari v. Daoud, a lawsuit brought by the families of Nepalese migrants who were murdered while traveling to work on a U.S. military base in Iraq. It traces the historical emergence of military outsourcing and the private military services industry and the ways they adopt imperial logics of race, gender, and labour. As Adhikari elucidates, military outsourcing marks and further enables the spread of neoliberalism in ways that eviscerate the rights and recognition of the already vulnerable and empower the already powerful without accountability.”

The workshop will be held on Friday, December 1, from 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM in Room 208N, the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place.

RVSP to wesley.attewell@utoronto.ca, by Monday, November 27.

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EASSU Hosts Film Screening: Manchurian Sleepwalkers

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Come to the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor) this Thursday, November 23 to watch the film screening of “Manchurian Sleepwalkers”, hosted by the East Asian Studies Students Union!

The film is directed and produced by Professor Thomas Lahusen, who will be present at the event doing an introduction and will also host a Q&A period at the end.

Film description: With the passage of time, remembering becomes a form of sleepwalking. One-time émigrés of Manchuria and its legendary city, Harbin, take us on a journey of memory back to China. For many — Russians, Poles, Germans and Japanese — who left the country of the “last emperor” during the late 1940s and 50s, remembering borders on obsession. For Kumiko Muraoka, a Japanese-French poet, only forgetting alleviates the pain of having lost her childhood home.

Check out the Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1512986375460030/
See more information about the film from the following link: https://www.chemodanfilms.com/manchurian-sleepwalkers-1

Sushi will be served.

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CASSU Event: China After the 19th Party Congress

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The Contemporary Asian Studies Students Union is hosting an event Tuesday, November 28, from 2:30 to 4 pm at BA2165. The event will consist of discussions by Professor Sida Liu and Professor Lynette Ong, who will analyze the topic of Contemporary China Studies from the perspectives of the Chinese legal system and elite politics, respectively.

The 19th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party took place in Beijing from October 18th – 24th. This week-long meeting attracted the attention of China-watchers from within and outside of the country, as the Congress defines a blueprint for the next five years of the CCP governance during President Xi Jinping’s second term. Within the Chinese Communist Party, the Congress reflected informal party norms of elite politics, and revealed new appointments to the echelon of power in the Politburo Standing Committee alongside amendments the Party’s Constitution under Xi. Beyond the party itself, the Congress discussed China’s increasingly assertive foreign policy just prior to President Trump’s visit to China. The duration of the conference also witnessed a tightening of security around the circulation of information and travel to accommodate for the Congress.

Please register here: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/event/24320/

Speaker Bios

Professor Lynette Ong is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, with a joint appointment at the Asian Institute and the Munk School of Global Affairs, where she currently serve as Director of Munk China Initiatives. Professor Ong is a renowned expert in the politics and political economy of China. Her main research interests are authoritarian politics and the political economy of development. She is a published author on issue areas such as local government debt, contentious politics, protest and land reform, state-led urbanization and more. Professor Ong will be sharing her insights on the topic of state-society relations and elite politics after the 19th Party Congress.

Professor Sida Liu is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto and a faculty fellow at the American Bar Foundation. He is also an affiliated scholar of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University School of Law and the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School. He has previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and directed its East Asian Legal Studies Center from 2014-2016. Most recently, Professor Liu was a member of the Institute for Advance Study in Princeton. His current research interests include the sociology of Chinese law and the legal profession, criminal justice, social theory and more. Professor Liu will be speaking on the topic of the 19th Party Congress from the perspective of legal reform in China.

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EAS Students Learn to STEP Forward at Re-Orientation Event

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The East Asian Studies Department and the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library successfully concluded the STEP Forward: Re-Orientation event of 2017.

The panel began with an introduction by Professor Andre Schmid, the Chair of East Asian Studies. Professor Schmid provided insights into the program of East Asian Studies, and warmly welcomed our first- and second-year students who declared EAS as their program of study. Following Professor Schmid, Professor Linda Feng, the Undergraduate Coordinator, Librarian Helen Tang, and the Program Administrator, Mary MacDonell, each gave an introduction of their respective positions and explained how they can assist the newly registered students in making their study at the EAS department successful.

The East Asian Studies Students Union (EASSU) was next to greet the students. As upper years, they also helped provide advice and personal anecdotes regarding aspects of the EAS program, as well as studying abroad in East Asia, that they have found to be memorable, useful, or interesting.

After EASSU, EAS faculty members were asked to share their wisdom with the young EAS enthusiasts. Professor Ken Kawashima, Professor Graham Sanders, and Professor Ikuko Komuro-Lee were asked several questions regarding their careers in the EAS department, their own motivations for studying East Asia, and what one should aim for in order to succeed in this program.

Lastly, before food and socializing, students from the EAS graduate program spoke about their learning and research within the field of East Asian Studies, and their own journeys on getting there.

We would like to thank all those that attended the event, and the panelists for providing insight into the program of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto to our first- and second-years.

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EAS Speaker Series: Full List of Speakers

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4th Annual “Shimotsuki-sai”: November Festival

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Come to the Purple Lounge on Friday, November 17 to join the fourth annual November Festival–Shimotsuki-sai! There will be Japanese cultural performances and presentations by EAS undergraduate students, as well as graduate students. We will be providing ton-jiru, a traditional Japanese miso soup with pork, and serving green tea as well.

All is welcome, so we hope to see you!

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Visiting Lecture: Whither Chinese Political Philosophy? The Role of Mainland New Confucianism

The Department of Political Science, in collaboration with the Department of East Asian Studies and the Centre for Ethics, presents a visiting lecture: “Whither Chinese Political Philosophy? The Role of Mainland New Confucianism”, by Professor Stephen C. Angle from Wesleyan University.

Stephen C. Angle is the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Wesleyan University.  He is the author of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (2012) and author or editor of  numerous other writings on contemporary Confucian thought, the history of Chinese thought, comparative human rights, and the practice of comparative philosophy, several of which have been translated into Mandarin.

The lecture will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017 at 12 pm, in the Centre for Ethics Seminar Room (Gerald Larkin Building, 15 Devonshire Place, Room 200).

Lunch will be served.

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Nation, Regions, Culture, Cuisine: What is Chinese Food?

Nation, Regions, Culture, Cuisine: What is Chinese Food?

The Food Studies program at UTSC is hosting a talk in the Purple Lounge this Friday, November 10, 2 pm to 4 pm.

aerial-photography-yunna-china-rice-fieldsThe guest speaker, Professor Michelle King of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is interested in research subjects that deal with gender, the body, imperialism/colonialism, and a conscious consideration of the processes of cultural translation. She focuses on the cultural history of nineteenth and twentieth-century China, as well as Chinese diasporas. Her last book was a study of the cultural distinctions between Chinese and Western perspectives on female infanticide in late nineteenth century China. Her new book project will examine the intersection of gender, foodways, and transnational Chinese identities through the life and career of postwar Taiwan’s pioneering female cookbook author and television personality, Fu Pei-Mei.

Come and learn about Chinese food culture!

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