Jackman Humanities Institute Presents Savage States: Settler Governance in an Age of Sorrow

On Wednesday January 17 at 4 PM, the Jackman Humanities Institute is hosting a talk by Dr. Audra Simpson from the Anthropology Department of Columbia University. In Savage States: Settler Governance in  an Age of Sorrow, Dr. Simpson considers the world of settler colonialism, which demands a newness and a world in which Native people and their claims to territory are whittled to the status of claimant or subject in time with the fantasy of their disappearance and containment away from a modern and critical present.

The event is hosted at Room 100 in the Jackman Humanities Institute building (170 St. George Street). It is free and open to all, we hope to see you there!

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EAS Speaker Series: Mobility and Borders between Russia and Asia: Claiming Korean Migrants in the Late Nineteenth Century by Dr. Alyssa Park

The East Asian Speakers Series presents a talk by Dr. Alyssa Park, Mobility and Borders between Russia and Asia: Claiming Korean Migrants in the Late Nineteenth Century on Friday, January 19, 1 – 3 pm at the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor). 

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The late nineteenth century was the era of mobility and bordermaking around the globe.  States defined borders and claimed space within them to an unprecedented degree, and people traveled across space, transgressing those borders.  This talk explores these topics in a single analytical lens through the case of Korean migrants living in the Maritime, the Russian side of a newly delineated border area (Korea, Russia, China).  Why they migrated, how officials viewed them, and what kinds of conflicts and questions arose from their respective claims on Koreans are subjects that will be discussed, as are the possibilities for the writing of transnational history for Russia and East Asia.

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Munk School Presents How ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaping Japan-South Korea Relations

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How Have the ‘North Korea Factors’ Shaped Japan-South Korea Relations?

The Centre for the Study of Global Japan, Asian Institute, and the Centre for the Study of Korea from the Munk School of Global Affairs present a talk from Dr. Seung Hyok Lee, Professor at the Department of Political Science at University of Toronto, and Associate Professor of Centre for the Study of Global Japan at the Munk School of Global Affairs.

The event will be held at 1 Devonshire Place, North House Room 208N on Friday, January 19, 2018 2:00 – 4:00 PM.

South Koreans and Japanese citizens have become influential in shaping their respective countries’ bilateral relations. This societal-level sway on government interactions is especially evident when a publicized shared issue linked to national security prompts the mainstream citizenry’s emotional involvement. This presentation will focus on Japan-South Korea bilateral relations during the last decade to illustrate this.

In the midst of the fast-changing regional security environment of the past ten years, the two societies have begun to re-evaluate and re-examine their respective Cold War period national security identities.

Interestingly, both countries’ identity-shifts were first fuelled by the changing domestic public attitude toward North Korea. The normative transformations sparked by the ‘North Korea factors’ has also led to a ‘mutual security anxiety’ between Japanese and South Koreans, as they learn to embrace a sense of uncertainty about the other side’s possible future trajectory. This societal-level mutual distrust continues to provide a powerful ideational limit to government-level bilateral interactions.

More information: Click Here

Register for the Event Here: http://uoft.me/japansouthkorea

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EAS308 Students Reveal the Wonder of Maps!

On Thursday December 7, an exhibition on maps of East Asia was held at the East Asian Library. Students from EAS308 brought in their beautifully designed posters to present various research topics they have researched.

 

The topics that students have chosen ranged from looking at comparisons between maps of the East versus the West, specific foci on maps of a certain period in Japan, China, or Korea and how they developed, landmarks on historical maps and where they are today, ways sea routes and floras are depicted in maps, and more.

 

Students shared their insights into the maps and provided interesting observations about them. Here are some of their discoveries:

25289245_10213235996005802_2486836241075824633_n“Both the Japanese and American maps during the wartime are drawn as cartoons, since they were meant for kids. The Japanese map had text on it, whereas the American one does not. This is because the audience for the American one is younger than the Japanese one. It is also interesting that except for the soldier controlling navy ships from Britain, the rest of the countries in Europe are portrayed as dogs with flags wrapped around them.”
— Wartime Cartography – Children’s Edition

img_7018“This map depicts a region in China called Ning Bo. On the side we’ve made a legend which shows various symbols used by the cartographer to represent religious institutions. While the prominent religion seems to be Buddhist and Daoist, Catholic churches and Mosques were also found in the region.”
— The Map and Land of Ning Bo

img_6998“The Cheonhado portrays land as round because of the influence of Chinese Buddhist and Daoist views. With China and Korea in the middle, they saw themselves as the centre of the world. Surrounding them are the ‘mystical lands’ which include the West and all the places they have not travelled to yet. Among them are also some fictional lands.”
— Cheonhado & Kangnido: Choson’s
Relationship with the World

25158213_10213235983245483_7541406414316950167_n“From the maps you can see the expansion of Edo through the changes in the waterways across time. Although major waterways remained constant, the smaller ones were filled up in order to make more land.”
— Tokugawa Edo: Dawn to Dusk Social Control and Social Change Seen in Maps

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East Asia on Maps Ancient and Modern: A Poster Session in the East Asian Library

East Asia on Maps Ancient and Modern
A Poster Session in the East Asian Library

Come by the Chen Yu Tung East Asian Library on Tuesday, December 5, from 12 to 1:30 pm to see a showcase of East Asian maps by the EAS308 students and learn about cartography.

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EAS Speaker Series: Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo by Naomi Paik

The East Asian Speakers Series presents a talk by Dr. Naomi Paik, Rightlessness: Hunger Strikes, Force-feeding, and testimony at Guantánamo on Friday, December 1, 3 pm to 5 pm at Sidney Smith Hall, Room 2125.

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Naomi Paik will address themes raised in her new book, Rightlessness: Testimony and Redress in U.S. Prison Camps Since World War II, which grapples with the history of U.S. prison camps that have confined people outside the boundaries of legal and civil rights. Removed from the social and political communities that would guarantee fundamental legal protections, these detainees are effectively rightless, stripped of the right even to have rights. Specifically, this talk will focus on both the bodily practices of and discourses surrounding prisoner practices of self-harm and the U.S. state’s efforts to preserve life—in particular, its force-feeding of hunger strikers at the current Guantánamo camp. By interpreting the testimonies of hunger strikers, Paik examines the prisoner body as a site of power and struggle waged between the U.S. state and the prisoners, who attempt to seize their own form of habeas corpus, taking their bodies back from the camp regime, by inflicting self-harm.


Alongside this talk, the Department of Geography and Planning, in collaboration with the Dr. David Chu Program in Asia-Pacific Studies, the Department of East Asian Studies, and the Centre for the Study of the United States, have also asked Naomi to participate in a more informal workshop with an interdisciplinary group of grad students and faculty. As part of this event, Naomi will be circulating a work-in-progress paper that she is currently revising for publication.

Its abstract will most likely look something like this:
“This essay examines the dangerous convergence of of neoliberal capitalism and state violence in military outsourcing. It does so by analyzing Adhikari v. Daoud, a lawsuit brought by the families of Nepalese migrants who were murdered while traveling to work on a U.S. military base in Iraq. It traces the historical emergence of military outsourcing and the private military services industry and the ways they adopt imperial logics of race, gender, and labour. As Adhikari elucidates, military outsourcing marks and further enables the spread of neoliberalism in ways that eviscerate the rights and recognition of the already vulnerable and empower the already powerful without accountability.”

The workshop will be held on Friday, December 1, from 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM in Room 208N, the Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place.

RVSP to wesley.attewell@utoronto.ca, by Monday, November 27.

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EASSU Hosts Film Screening: Manchurian Sleepwalkers

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Come to the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor) this Thursday, November 23 to watch the film screening of “Manchurian Sleepwalkers”, hosted by the East Asian Studies Students Union!

The film is directed and produced by Professor Thomas Lahusen, who will be present at the event doing an introduction and will also host a Q&A period at the end.

Film description: With the passage of time, remembering becomes a form of sleepwalking. One-time émigrés of Manchuria and its legendary city, Harbin, take us on a journey of memory back to China. For many — Russians, Poles, Germans and Japanese — who left the country of the “last emperor” during the late 1940s and 50s, remembering borders on obsession. For Kumiko Muraoka, a Japanese-French poet, only forgetting alleviates the pain of having lost her childhood home.

Check out the Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1512986375460030/
See more information about the film from the following link: https://www.chemodanfilms.com/manchurian-sleepwalkers-1

Sushi will be served.

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CASSU Event: China After the 19th Party Congress

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The Contemporary Asian Studies Students Union is hosting an event Tuesday, November 28, from 2:30 to 4 pm at BA2165. The event will consist of discussions by Professor Sida Liu and Professor Lynette Ong, who will analyze the topic of Contemporary China Studies from the perspectives of the Chinese legal system and elite politics, respectively.

The 19th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party took place in Beijing from October 18th – 24th. This week-long meeting attracted the attention of China-watchers from within and outside of the country, as the Congress defines a blueprint for the next five years of the CCP governance during President Xi Jinping’s second term. Within the Chinese Communist Party, the Congress reflected informal party norms of elite politics, and revealed new appointments to the echelon of power in the Politburo Standing Committee alongside amendments the Party’s Constitution under Xi. Beyond the party itself, the Congress discussed China’s increasingly assertive foreign policy just prior to President Trump’s visit to China. The duration of the conference also witnessed a tightening of security around the circulation of information and travel to accommodate for the Congress.

Please register here: https://munkschool.utoronto.ca/ai/event/24320/

Speaker Bios

Professor Lynette Ong is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, with a joint appointment at the Asian Institute and the Munk School of Global Affairs, where she currently serve as Director of Munk China Initiatives. Professor Ong is a renowned expert in the politics and political economy of China. Her main research interests are authoritarian politics and the political economy of development. She is a published author on issue areas such as local government debt, contentious politics, protest and land reform, state-led urbanization and more. Professor Ong will be sharing her insights on the topic of state-society relations and elite politics after the 19th Party Congress.

Professor Sida Liu is an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Toronto and a faculty fellow at the American Bar Foundation. He is also an affiliated scholar of the U.S.-Asia Law Institute at New York University School of Law and the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School. He has previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and directed its East Asian Legal Studies Center from 2014-2016. Most recently, Professor Liu was a member of the Institute for Advance Study in Princeton. His current research interests include the sociology of Chinese law and the legal profession, criminal justice, social theory and more. Professor Liu will be speaking on the topic of the 19th Party Congress from the perspective of legal reform in China.

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EAS Students Learn to STEP Forward at Re-Orientation Event

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The East Asian Studies Department and the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library successfully concluded the STEP Forward: Re-Orientation event of 2017.

The panel began with an introduction by Professor Andre Schmid, the Chair of East Asian Studies. Professor Schmid provided insights into the program of East Asian Studies, and warmly welcomed our first- and second-year students who declared EAS as their program of study. Following Professor Schmid, Professor Linda Feng, the Undergraduate Coordinator, Librarian Helen Tang, and the Program Administrator, Mary MacDonell, each gave an introduction of their respective positions and explained how they can assist the newly registered students in making their study at the EAS department successful.

The East Asian Studies Students Union (EASSU) was next to greet the students. As upper years, they also helped provide advice and personal anecdotes regarding aspects of the EAS program, as well as studying abroad in East Asia, that they have found to be memorable, useful, or interesting.

After EASSU, EAS faculty members were asked to share their wisdom with the young EAS enthusiasts. Professor Ken Kawashima, Professor Graham Sanders, and Professor Ikuko Komuro-Lee were asked several questions regarding their careers in the EAS department, their own motivations for studying East Asia, and what one should aim for in order to succeed in this program.

Lastly, before food and socializing, students from the EAS graduate program spoke about their learning and research within the field of East Asian Studies, and their own journeys on getting there.

We would like to thank all those that attended the event, and the panelists for providing insight into the program of East Asian Studies at the University of Toronto to our first- and second-years.

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EAS Speaker Series: Full List of Speakers

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4th Annual “Shimotsuki-sai”: November Festival

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Come to the Purple Lounge on Friday, November 17 to join the fourth annual November Festival–Shimotsuki-sai! There will be Japanese cultural performances and presentations by EAS undergraduate students, as well as graduate students. We will be providing ton-jiru, a traditional Japanese miso soup with pork, and serving green tea as well.

All is welcome, so we hope to see you!

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Visiting Lecture: Whither Chinese Political Philosophy? The Role of Mainland New Confucianism

The Department of Political Science, in collaboration with the Department of East Asian Studies and the Centre for Ethics, presents a visiting lecture: “Whither Chinese Political Philosophy? The Role of Mainland New Confucianism”, by Professor Stephen C. Angle from Wesleyan University.

Stephen C. Angle is the Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Wesleyan University.  He is the author of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (2012) and author or editor of  numerous other writings on contemporary Confucian thought, the history of Chinese thought, comparative human rights, and the practice of comparative philosophy, several of which have been translated into Mandarin.

The lecture will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017 at 12 pm, in the Centre for Ethics Seminar Room (Gerald Larkin Building, 15 Devonshire Place, Room 200).

Lunch will be served.

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Nation, Regions, Culture, Cuisine: What is Chinese Food?

Nation, Regions, Culture, Cuisine: What is Chinese Food?

The Food Studies program at UTSC is hosting a talk in the Purple Lounge this Friday, November 10, 2 pm to 4 pm.

aerial-photography-yunna-china-rice-fieldsThe guest speaker, Professor Michelle King of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is interested in research subjects that deal with gender, the body, imperialism/colonialism, and a conscious consideration of the processes of cultural translation. She focuses on the cultural history of nineteenth and twentieth-century China, as well as Chinese diasporas. Her last book was a study of the cultural distinctions between Chinese and Western perspectives on female infanticide in late nineteenth century China. Her new book project will examine the intersection of gender, foodways, and transnational Chinese identities through the life and career of postwar Taiwan’s pioneering female cookbook author and television personality, Fu Pei-Mei.

Come and learn about Chinese food culture!

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STEP Forward: (Re)-Orientation Event for those who have recently declared EAS as their Program of Study!

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Did you recently declare EAS as your program of study? Come to the EAS Re-Orientation event on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 from 4 pm to 6:30 pm at the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor).

Students will be able to speak with current EAS students, current EAS graduate students, and EAS faculty members to get information on:

  • ways to plan your progression through your program
  • how to choose courses efficiently
  • research foci within the department
  • studying abroad and research opportunities
  • career planning in EAS

Register Here for the event. Dinner will be provided.

We hope to see you soon!

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International Conference: Spotlight on the Indigenous Cultural Studies in Taiwan

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On October 26 and 27, The Department of East Asian Studies and the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library presented a two-day conference on the topic of indigenous cultural writings in Taiwan. Our lovely banner is designed by Mengying Fan, a first-year student of the MA program for East Asian Studies to signify the art of Atayal facial tattoo in light of our discussions on Atayal culture.

On Thursday, October 26, the Department welcomed Yuma Taru and Baunay Watan, two Atayal artists in to speak about Atayal culture. Yuma presented a video with footage from her village. They shared with us stories of their experiences and inspirations that drew them to the study of Atayal culture. Yuma provided insight into the art of Atayal clothing and, using the tools she brought from Taiwan, demonstrated how Atayal clothing is woven. Baunay discussed the beauty of Atayal facial tattoo, and shared stunning photos he had taken, in both black-and-white and colour, depicting Atayal Culture.

 

Day two of the conference commenced with two talks by Professor Chih-Ching Yang and Professor Yi-Shin Wu from the National Chung Cheng University in Taiwan. Professor Yang spoke about the imagery of Taiwan’s landscape and indigenous people during the early Japanese governance through three case studies: Taiyō, Huuzoku Gaho, and Hinodejima-Volume Niitaka. Professor Wu presented her research on the politics of translation in Banzin Dowa Densetsu Senshū.

Following, the Professor and Director of the Graduate Institute of Taiwanese Literature and Creative Innovation from the National Chung Cheng University of Taiwan, Professor Pao-Chai Chiang, presented “The Ways for Taiwan Indigenous Peoples to Return Home”. Then, drawing a connection between indigenous peoples’ experiences in Taiwan and Canada, Professor Terry Russell, Professor and Acting Director of the Asian Studies Centre at the University of Manitoba, discussed the differences and similarities of Taiwan and Canadian indigenous autobiography.

Concluding the event, Professor Darryl Sterk from the Department of Translation at Lingnan University, Hong Kong, presented a talk entitled “Translators Bale: The Seediq Translation of Seediq Tale”.

 

We warmly thank the guest speakers who shared their enriching experiences, our panelists and moderators for their input, the sponsors for making the event possible, and guests who attended the event.

If you wish to learn more about the indigenous cultures of Taiwan we invite you to visit the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library (8th floor of Robarts Library), which has mounted a special book display, “Publications of Indigenous Cultural Studies in Taiwan”, on display from October 25 to November 25, 2017.

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Munk School Asian Institute Presents Transnational Domesticity in the Making of Modern Korea

hyaeweol-choi-bannerThe Asian Institute of the Munk School of Global Affairs introduces a presentation by Professor Hyaeweol Choi from the Australian National University.

hyaeweol-choi-poster-picThe topic of study for this presentation is on modern domesticity in colonial-era Korea, which has generally been understood using the twin parameters of nationalism and colonialism. Much less attention has been paid to the impact of a transpacific network, mainly between the US and Korea through the Christian missionary societies, on the formation of modern domesticity before, during and after Japanese colonial rule.

Professor Choi will demonstrate the ways in which Korea’s modern domesticity was shaped by not only Japanese colonial policies but also the notion of modernity that was transmitted, reinterpreted and performed through the transpacific network that had formed among the Korean elite and American missionaries. Taking the idea of “modern home” as a key locus where national, colonial and missionary projects converged, how the intimate private sphere was rendered as one of the most dynamic sites for uncovering the confluence of interaction between the local, the national and the global will be discussed.

Register herehttp://uoft.me/TRANSNATIONALDOMESTICITYKOREA

More information here: Transnational Domesticity in the Making of Modern Korea

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EAS Speaker Series: Tracing the Itinerant Path: Jishū Nuns of Medieval Japan by Dr. Caitilin Griffiths

The East Asian Speakers Series presents a talk by Dr. Caitilin Griffiths, Tracing the Itinerant Path: Jishū Nuns of Medieval Japan on Thursday, November 2, 4pm at the Purple Lounge (Robarts Library, 14th floor). 

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This talk introduces the jishū, a prominent and popular Pure Land Buddhist movement of medieval Japan. It was a mixed gender group, with nuns travelling, preaching, chanting and dancing alongside the monks. Women have long been active supporters and promoters of Buddhist rituals and functions, but female presence and importance in the operations of Buddhist schools has often been minimized. The examine of the jishū, as highlighted in Dr. Griffiths’ book, helps fill in the lacunae that exists in our understanding of women’s participation in Japanese religious history. We discover that there was a fluid and engaging community in which women held important roles, including leadership of mixed gender congregations.

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Presentations on Taiwan Cinema at the Chen Yu Tung East Asian Library

The Chen Yu Tung East Asian Library organizes two events on the discussion of Taiwan Cinema on November 7 and 8, 2017.

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The first event is a presentation by Professor Robert Chen from the Department of Radio-TV, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. He will speak about the role Taiwan cinema played throughout the process of modernization and democratization in Taiwan during the past half century, with a particular focus on the period between 1987 and 2017, after the rise of the Taiwan New Cinema movement.

For more information: Taiwan-Cinema-and-the-Specter-of-the-Martial-Law

Register Here: http://bit.ly/2iACIJz

prof-robert-chenDr. Ru-Shou Robert Chen is a professor at the Department of Radio-TV, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. His research interests include Taiwan cinema, film theory, everyday life sociology and cultural studies. His recent publications include Cinema Taiwan: Politics, Popularity, and State of the Arts (edited work), and Through a Screen Darkly: One Hundred Years of Reflections on Taiwan Cinema (in Chinese).

 

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The second event involves screenings of five Taiwan short films and discussions by Professor Bart Testa and Professor Robert Chen at the Media Commons Centre (Robarts Library, 3rd floor). Seats are limited so register now!

For more information: Taiwan Short Films Screening

Register here: http://bit.ly/2ieURDn

Films that will be screened include:

  • 母親節  (Mother’s Day) – 張哲魁  (Jack Chang)
  •   (The Door) – 孫悅慈  (Yueh Tzu Sun)
  • 後人類  (Post-Human) – 蘇子琳  (Tzu Lin Su)
  • 孤獨時光  (The Lonely Time) – 柯奕廷  (Yi Ting Ko)
  • 慢吞吞小學  (Snail School) – 鄒維綱  (Wei Kang Chou)
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Fall Campus Day: EAS Department Attracts Attention from Prospective Students

EAS banner Campus Day

With help from the East Asian Studies Students Union, the Department attracted numerous prospective students to take interest in the studies of East Asia.

These students, many of whom are still in high school and first year university, asked curiously: “What does the department offer?”, “Can I actually learn a language here?”, “Are there any chances to go overseas?”, “Will I be required to write a lot of papers for EAS courses?”
Our volunteers enthusiastically answered each and every one of them.
Like many of our previous and current students, a good handful of students were interested in learning new languages. The increased popularity in Korean among youths was also evident when we asked students which language they were interested in. Nevertheless, all three East Asian languages offered by our department–Chinese, Korean and Japanese, received great attention from prospective students.

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International Conference: Multiculturality and Indigenous Cultural Writings in Taiwan

ic-taiwan-bannerCome to the International Conference to learn more about Multiculturality and Indigenous Cultural Writings in Taiwan! The conference will present exciting discussion and demonstration on Atayal culture. It will also present stimulating talks on the history and trans-cultural comparison of Taiwanese indigenous culture.

The event takes place on Thursday, October 26 (2-5pm) and Friday, October 27 (12-6pm) at the Purple Lounge. It is free and open to all.

You can catch the livestream here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zR-WosHgepU

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